Terrasol Community Proposed for 2006

29 11 2005

Terrasol is poised to be the newest gated residential community in one of the most sought after residential areas in Southside. Due to a tremendous success of Il Villgio community, the developer has planed to open Terrasol, a 344-unit multi-family in a gated community on 40.36 acres. There will be 22 condominium and townhome buildings with one clubhouse. Conveniently located near Tinseltown and St. Johns Town Center, the community will offer affordable housing starting from the $180’s to $300’s. Opening in summer 2006. Call (904) 307-8998 for more information.





Most Expensive Gated Communities 2005

29 11 2005

For the third year in a row, Forbes.com compiled a list of the most expensive gated communities in the U.S.

At the top of the list is Star Island, where the highest-priced home currently on the market is $50 million. The list is ranked by the costliest home currently for sale in each community; land is excluded. Floria tops the list again this year.

1. Star Island, Miami Beach, FL – Highest Price $50 million
2. Seminole Landing, North Palm Beach, FL – Highest Price $36.5 million
3. Beverly Park, Los Angeles, CA – Highest Price $30 million
4. Brentwood Country Estates, Los Angeles, CA – Highest Price $29.5 million
5. Pebble Beach, Pebble Beach, CA – Highest Price $28.5 million
6. Indian Creek Island, Indian Creek, FL – Highest Price $28 million
7. Puakea Bay Ranch, Big Island, HI – Highest Price $25 million
8. Three Arch Bay, Laguna Beach, CA – Highest Price $22.9 million
9. The Sanctuary, Boca Raton, FL – Highest Price $22.5 million
10. Pelican Crest, New Port Coast, CA – Highest Price $17.9 million
11. Washington Park, Seattle, WA – Highest Price $16.5 million
12. Royal Palm Yacht & Country Club, Boca Raton, FL – Highest Price $15.95 million

Not only gated communities are popular with home buyers, but also developers and municipalities love them. Developers can demand higher prices by adding security (or at least the appearance of it) to new subdivisions. Local governments, strapped for cash, get new residents without having to foot the bills for new roads, which the developer builds. And the home owner associations take care of some public services, such as road maintenance and trash collection.

The idea has been spilling across the globe as well, with private communities popping up in France, Argentina, South Africa, Israel, China and many other countries. In the U.S., gated neighborhoods can be traced back to at least the 19th century. Tuxedo Park, a well-known enclave of mansions and lush parkland an hour north of New York City, was begun in the 1880s. Llewellyn Park in West Orange, N.J., thought to be the first planned gated community in the country, was founded in 1853. Thomas Edison, the Merck family and the Colgates all had impressive homes there.

Today, the affluent and well-known are still drawn to private, protected neighborhoods, and are willing to pay top dollars to live in them.

Source: Forbes.com





Terrasol Community Proposed for 2006

29 11 2005

Terrasol is poised to be the newest gated residential community in one of the most sought after residential areas in Southside. Due to a tremendous success of Il Villgio community, the developer has planed to open Terrasol, a 344-unit multi-family in a gated community on 40.36 acres. There will be 22 condominium and townhome buildings with one clubhouse. Conveniently located near Tinseltown and St. Johns Town Center, the community will offer affordable housing starting from the $180’s to $300’s. Opening in summer 2006. Call (904) 307-8998 for more information.





Most Expensive Gated Communities 2005

28 11 2005

For the third year in a row, Forbes.com compiled a list of the most expensive gated communities in the U.S.

At the top of the list is Star Island, where the highest-priced home currently on the market is $50 million. The list is ranked by the costliest home currently for sale in each community; land is excluded. Floria tops the list again this year.

1. Star Island, Miami Beach, FL – Highest Price $50 million
2. Seminole Landing, North Palm Beach, FL – Highest Price $36.5 million
3. Beverly Park, Los Angeles, CA – Highest Price $30 million
4. Brentwood Country Estates, Los Angeles, CA – Highest Price $29.5 million
5. Pebble Beach, Pebble Beach, CA – Highest Price $28.5 million
6. Indian Creek Island, Indian Creek, FL – Highest Price $28 million
7. Puakea Bay Ranch, Big Island, HI – Highest Price $25 million
8. Three Arch Bay, Laguna Beach, CA – Highest Price $22.9 million
9. The Sanctuary, Boca Raton, FL – Highest Price $22.5 million
10. Pelican Crest, New Port Coast, CA – Highest Price $17.9 million
11. Washington Park, Seattle, WA – Highest Price $16.5 million
12. Royal Palm Yacht & Country Club, Boca Raton, FL – Highest Price $15.95 million

Not only gated communities are popular with home buyers, but also developers and municipalities love them. Developers can demand higher prices by adding security (or at least the appearance of it) to new subdivisions. Local governments, strapped for cash, get new residents without having to foot the bills for new roads, which the developer builds. And the home owner associations take care of some public services, such as road maintenance and trash collection.

The idea has been spilling across the globe as well, with private communities popping up in France, Argentina, South Africa, Israel, China and many other countries. In the U.S., gated neighborhoods can be traced back to at least the 19th century. Tuxedo Park, a well-known enclave of mansions and lush parkland an hour north of New York City, was begun in the 1880s. Llewellyn Park in West Orange, N.J., thought to be the first planned gated community in the country, was founded in 1853. Thomas Edison, the Merck family and the Colgates all had impressive homes there.

Today, the affluent and well-known are still drawn to private, protected neighborhoods, and are willing to pay top dollars to live in them.

Source: Forbes.com





FICO Credit Scores

24 11 2005

An estimated 50 million consumers are locked out of access to credit because they lack the credit history needed to generate an acceptable FICO score, but a number of companies, including FICO itself, have created new ways to analyze a consumer’s creditworthiness.

Fair Isaac Corp., the company that pioneered this form of credit scoring, produces the FICO and is offering one of the new credit scores, which it calls the FICO Expansion score. Along with other players in this rapidly expanding market, Fair Isaac hopes to attract lenders eager to expand their customer base.

Drawing on alternative credit data such as bank account records, payday loan payment records and installment purchase plans, Fair Isaac produces a credit score that is modeled on the traditional FICO score’s 300 to 850 point range.

Pros: These new forms of credit scoring are a wedge into the traditional credit market that many consumers can use to prove to lenders that they are a good credit risk. Many other consumers may be able to access credit through nontraditional scoring methods. These include recent high school or college graduates, divorcees or widows and people with some blemishes on their traditional credit report.

Cons: While many consumers who haven’t had access to credit may applaud these new scores, other consumers may rue the day that a lender relied on one of these scores if that credit isn’t used wisely. As with traditional credit reports and the traditional FICO score, the newer scores are only as good as the data they are built on. Just as there can be mistakes in your credit report, inaccurate information obtained on your nontraditional payments can negatively impact your ability to get loans.

Source: Bankrate.com





FICO Credit Scores

23 11 2005

An estimated 50 million consumers are locked out of access to credit because they lack the credit history needed to generate an acceptable FICO score, but a number of companies, including FICO itself, have created new ways to analyze a consumer’s creditworthiness.

Fair Isaac Corp., the company that pioneered this form of credit scoring, produces the FICO and is offering one of the new credit scores, which it calls the FICO Expansion score. Along with other players in this rapidly expanding market, Fair Isaac hopes to attract lenders eager to expand their customer base.

Drawing on alternative credit data such as bank account records, payday loan payment records and installment purchase plans, Fair Isaac produces a credit score that is modeled on the traditional FICO score’s 300 to 850 point range.

Pros: These new forms of credit scoring are a wedge into the traditional credit market that many consumers can use to prove to lenders that they are a good credit risk. Many other consumers may be able to access credit through nontraditional scoring methods. These include recent high school or college graduates, divorcees or widows and people with some blemishes on their traditional credit report.

Cons: While many consumers who haven’t had access to credit may applaud these new scores, other consumers may rue the day that a lender relied on one of these scores if that credit isn’t used wisely. As with traditional credit reports and the traditional FICO score, the newer scores are only as good as the data they are built on. Just as there can be mistakes in your credit report, inaccurate information obtained on your nontraditional payments can negatively impact your ability to get loans.

Source: Bankrate.com





Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005

17 11 2005

Headed out to Home Depot to replace some windows? Hold on! If you can wait until January 1st, Uncle Sam might just be able to help you with tax credits, via the Energy Tax Incentives Act of 2005. The Act was created to provide homeowners with tax credits for certain improvements to a residence that make a property more energy efficient. And with the winter month’s right around the corner and the expected jump in energy prices, many individuals may be considering a few alternatives to help take the chill out of the air while lowering their energy bill.

So here’s the scoop on several of the eligible improvements, and the tax credits associated with each. All new windows that are purchased and installed will provide a homeowner with a maximum tax credit of $200. Doors, skylights, insulation, and metal roofs coated with heat-reducing pigments provide a credit of 10% of the cost up to a maximum of $500. The largest credit allows up to 30% of the cost or a maximum of a $2,000 credit for the equipment and installation of solar water heating, so long as it is not used for swimming pools or hot tubs.

And while the tax credits are welcomed, the return on investment for making these improvements could save hundreds if not thousands of dollars in energy bills, as well as boost the value of a property. To best determine the improvements that will give you the most bang for your buck start by visiting the Home Energy Saver website, simply by visit Home Energy Website. Want to know what other homeowners in your area are paying for their energy bills? Simply enter the zip code of your city and a chart will be displayed with the average energy bill for a regular home and a home that is energy efficient (specific to your area). Additionally, take a few minutes, enter all the data that is relevant to your specific home and within a few moments a calculation will be performed that will provide you with a list of specific recommendations for energy efficiency improvements that can be made to lower your energy bill.








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